Weekly Meeting Time and Location

Meditation on Marco meets every Thursday evening from 6:30pm to 8:00pm at

St. Mark's Episcopal Church, 1101 North Collier Blvd, Marco Island

For further questions, please contact Patty Meyers at: patty@bloodhound.net

Verses on the Faith Mind (All)

 

(bell)/(Drum Begins)

The Great Way is not difficult

for those who do not pick and choose.

When pref’rences are cast aside

the Way stands clear and undisguised.

But even slight distinctions made

set earth and heaven far apart.

If you would clearly see the truth,

 

I am of the nature to grow old. There is no way to escape growing old.

I am of the nature to have ill health. There is no way to escape ill health.

I am of the nature to die. There is no way to escape death.

All that is dear to me and everyone I love are of the nature to change. There is no way to escape being separated from them.

My actions are my only true belongings. I cannot escape the consequences of my actions. My actions are the ground upon which I stand.

The Five Mindfulness Trainings represent the Buddhist vision for a global spirituality and ethic. They are Thich Nhat Hanh's expression of the Buddha’s teachings on the path of understanding and true love, leading to healing, transformation, and happiness for ourselves and for the world. To practice the Five Mindfulness Trainings is to cultivate the insight of interbeing, which can remove all discrimination, intolerance, anger, fear, and despair.

The Sanskrit word paramita means to cross over to the other shore. Paramita may also be translated as perfection, perfect realization, or reaching beyond limitation. Through the practice of these six paramitas, we cross over the sea of suffering (samsara) to the shore of happiness and awakening (Nirvana); we cross over from ignorance and delusion to enlightenment. Each of the six paramitas is an enlightened quality of the heart, a glorious virtue or attribute—the innate seed of perfect realization within us. The paramitas are the very essence of our true nature. However, since these enlightened qualities of the heart have become obscured by delusion, selfishness, and other karmic tendencies, we must develop these potential qualities and bring them into expression. In this way, the six paramitas are an inner cultivation, a daily practice for wise, compassionate, loving, and enlightened living. The paramitas are the six kinds of virtuous practice required for skillfully serving the welfare of others and for the attainment of enlightenment. We must understand that bringing these virtuous qualities of our true nature into expression requires discipline, practice, and sincere cultivation. This is the path of the Bodhisattva—one who is dedicated to serving the highest welfare of all living beings with the awakened heart of unconditional love, skillful wisdom, and all-embracing compassion.

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